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Exercise and Diabetes

Exercise is important for managing diabetes
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Individual results may vary.

Exercise is one of the top 3 ways for controlling blood sugar, along with following a healthy diabetes meal plan and taking medicine as part of your treatment plan. Exercise is especially important for people with diabetes.

Before you start

Talk to your doctor before you start an exercise program. Your doctor can help you decide what kind of physical activities are right for you. You'll also want to have a discussion about the diabetes medicines you take, both prescription and over-the-counter. You may need to change the amount you take before you exercise.

Ideas for exercise when you have diabetes

  • Extra daily activity. Chores like walking the dog, cleaning the house, and washing the car are activities you can use to boost your activity level. The idea is to lengthen some of your daily tasks in order to be active longer. You can also replace some daily activities with others. For instance, instead of taking a coffee break or having a snack, you could go for a walk
  • Aerobic exercise. This type of activity means raising your heart rate and probably breaking a sweat. With aerobic exercise, you use the large muscles in your body, such as the ones in your legs. This could include brisk walking or hiking, cycling, basketball or other sports, dancing, or taking an aerobics class at the gym
  • Strength training. Lifting weights or working with resistance can help you build muscle. This type of exercise can help you burn calories more easily, since muscle burns more calories than fat. With larger, stronger muscles, you may find that you have better coordination and balance
  • Stretching. Simple stretches like touching your toes or sitting cross-legged can make your muscles more flexible. It can also help your muscles feel less sore after exercise or a long, active day

How you choose to exercise is less important than finding a way to stay active regularly. Learn more about being active as a part of your life on Cornerstones4Care.com.

Exercise and low blood glucose

It is possible that exercise can cause low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia. You may have to lower your dose of medicine to avoid low blood sugar while exercising. It may also be a good idea to bring a snack or glucose tablets in case your blood sugar gets too low while you are exercising. After exercising, check to see how it affected your blood sugar level. As always, speak to your doctor if you are concerned about low blood sugar. Learn more about the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia by visiting Cornerstones4Care.com.

Indications and Usage

What is NovoLog® (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection)?

  • NovoLog® is a man-made insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes mellitus.

Important Safety Information for NovoLog®

Who should not take NovoLog®?

Do not take NovoLog® if:

  • your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients.

Before taking NovoLog®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are:

  • pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.
  • taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements.

Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar.

How should I take NovoLog®?

  • Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed.
  • NovoLog® is fast-acting. Eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes after taking it.
  • Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to.
  • Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them.
  • Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes. You may give or get an infection from another person.

What should I avoid while taking NovoLog®?

  • Do not drive or operate heavy machinery, until you know how NovoLog® affects you.
  • Do not drink alcohol or use medicines that contain alcohol.

What are the possible side effects of NovoLog®?

Serious side effects can lead to death, including:

Low blood sugar. Some signs and symptoms include:

  • anxiety, irritability, mood changes, dizziness, sweating, confusion, and headache.

Your insulin dose may need to change because of:

  • weight gain or loss, increased stress, illness, or change in diet or level of physical activity.

Other common side effects may include:

  • low potassium in your blood, injection site reactions, itching, rash, serious whole body allergic reactions, skin thickening or pits at the injection site, weight gain, and swelling of your hands and feet and if taken with thiazolidinediones (TZDs) possible heart failure.

Get emergency medical help if you have:

  • trouble breathing, shortness of breath, fast heartbeat, swelling of your face, tongue, or throat, sweating, extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion.

For more information, please click here for complete NovoLog® Prescribing Information.

NovoLog® is a prescription medicine.

Talk to your doctor about the importance of diet and exercise in your treatment plan.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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If you need assistance with prescription drug costs, help may be available. Visit pparx.org or call 1-888-4PPA-NOW.

Selected Important Safety Information

Who should not take NovoLog®?

Do not take NovoLog® if:

  • your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients.

How should I take NovoLog®?

  • Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed.
  • NovoLog® is fast-acting. Eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes after taking it.
  • Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to.
  • Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them.
  • Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes. You may give or get an infection from another person.

Please click here for additional Important Safety Information

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