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Type 1 Diabetes

The moment we knew
(0:48 min.)

My parentʼs journey with my type 1 diabetes
(0:31 min.)

The challenges of type 1 diabetes
(0:27 min.)

Individual results may vary.

Type 1 diabetes, previously called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, represents 5% to 10% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Children, teenagers, and young adults are the people who are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes most often.

Insulin and type 1 diabetes

Insulin is a hormone made by beta cells in the pancreas. Insulin helps the body use sugar as fuel. The body constantly checks how much sugar is in the bloodstream. When blood sugar levels rise, the body tells the pancreas to release more insulin.

In type 1 diabetes, the body's own immune system mistakenly attacks beta cells, the special cells that produce insulin. Over a period of months or years, the beta cells stop working. This happens without symptoms or pain. With fewer beta cells, the pancreas cannot produce all the insulin that the body needs.

When there is not enough insulin, sugar in the blood cannot be used by the body as fuel. Instead, the sugar builds up in the blood. This can be harmful to the body in many ways and can lead to the symptoms of diabetes. This is when you may need diabetes medicines, such as NovoLog® with a long-acting insulin, to help control your blood sugar.

Type 1 diabetes symptoms

Symptoms of type 1 diabetes may include

  • Increased thirst and hunger
  • Frequent urination
  • Weight loss
  • Blurry vision
  • Feeling very tired

People with type 1 diabetes may also have problems with

  • Infections of the skin, gum, or bladder
  • Scrapes or bruises healing slower than usual
  • Tingling or numbness in the limbs

What causes type 1 diabetes?

It is not known exactly what causes the body's immune system to attack the beta cells. It is believed that family history, viruses, and environmental factors may be involved.

Type 1 diabetes treatment

Treatment for type 1 diabetes includes taking insulin regularly. Itʼs also important for people with this form of diabetes to choose the right foods and get plenty of exercise.

When you use an insulin like NovoLog® (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection) and make healthy lifestyle choices, you are taking an active role in managing your blood sugar levels. Adding both exercise and good nutrition is also an important part of treatment.

Next: Type 2 Diabetes >

Indications and Usage

What is NovoLog® (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection)?

  • NovoLog® is a man-made insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes mellitus.

Important Safety Information for NovoLog®

Who should not take NovoLog®?

Do not take NovoLog® if:

  • your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients.

Before taking NovoLog®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are:

  • pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.
  • taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements.

Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar.

How should I take NovoLog®?

  • Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed.
  • NovoLog® is fast-acting. Eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes after taking it.
  • Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to.
  • Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them.
  • Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes. You may give or get an infection from another person.

What should I avoid while taking NovoLog®?

  • Do not drive or operate heavy machinery, until you know how NovoLog® affects you.
  • Do not drink alcohol or use medicines that contain alcohol.

What are the possible side effects of NovoLog®?

Serious side effects can lead to death, including:

Low blood sugar. Some signs and symptoms include:

  • anxiety, irritability, mood changes, dizziness, sweating, confusion, and headache.

Your insulin dose may need to change because of:

  • weight gain or loss, increased stress, illness, or change in diet or level of physical activity.

Other common side effects may include:

  • low potassium in your blood, injection site reactions, itching, rash, serious whole body allergic reactions, skin thickening or pits at the injection site, weight gain, and swelling of your hands and feet and if taken with thiazolidinediones (TZDs) possible heart failure.

Get emergency medical help if you have:

  • trouble breathing, shortness of breath, fast heartbeat, swelling of your face, tongue, or throat, sweating, extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion.

For more information, please click here for complete NovoLog® Prescribing Information.

NovoLog® is a prescription medicine.

Talk to your doctor about the importance of diet and exercise in your treatment plan.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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If you need assistance with prescription drug costs, help may be available. Visit pparx.org or call 1-888-4PPA-NOW.

Selected Important Safety Information

Who should not take NovoLog®?

Do not take NovoLog® if:

  • your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients.

How should I take NovoLog®?

  • Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed.
  • NovoLog® is fast-acting. Eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes after taking it.
  • Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to.
  • Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them.
  • Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes. You may give or get an infection from another person.

Please click here for additional Important Safety Information

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